manymany:

Janet Delaney
- by -cabinadelafoto-

Flickr: http://flic.kr/p/ovTq3p

- by -cabinadelafoto-

Flickr: http://flic.kr/p/ovTq3p

The Batgirl of Burnside, by Mike Feegan.  RIGHTEOUS.

The Batgirl of Burnside, by Mike Feegan.  RIGHTEOUS.

newsweek:

Meyer Shussett was a fifty-two-year-old salesman from Pittsburgh who had lost a lot of money in the depression. 

He took a train to New Castle on a January weekend in 1933 and spent Saturday night walking from bar to bar with boxes of counterfeit Pollock cigars, which he sold cheap until he was arrested by a patrolman. 

The mayor fined him $20. 

Later—after the Depression, after the war—he managed a variety store in Pittsburgh. 

One morning in 1951, he had just opened the store when a man walked in and asked for a T-shirt. 

When Meyer turned to get a box down from the shelf, the man hit him on the head with a brick. 

After finding only a few dollars in the register, the man hit him with the brick again and left the store. Meyer went home. His family took him to the hospital, where he was given fourteen stitches to close his wounds. 

There is no further record of his life. Sources: New Castle News (16 January 1933, “Pittsburgh Man Pays Heavy Fine”; 9 October 1951, “Thug Uses Brick”); Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, 9 October 1951, “Thug Beats Up Storekeeper”. 

Meyer Shussett, “Suspicion”, 14 January 1933 | Small Town Noir

Maybe I shouldn’t reblog Small Town Noir so nobody will know I’m about to steal the whole thing. Eh, no one reads this blog anyway.

newsweek:

Meyer Shussett was a fifty-two-year-old salesman from Pittsburgh who had lost a lot of money in the depression.

He took a train to New Castle on a January weekend in 1933 and spent Saturday night walking from bar to bar with boxes of counterfeit Pollock cigars, which he sold cheap until he was arrested by a patrolman.

The mayor fined him $20.

Later—after the Depression, after the war—he managed a variety store in Pittsburgh.

One morning in 1951, he had just opened the store when a man walked in and asked for a T-shirt.

When Meyer turned to get a box down from the shelf, the man hit him on the head with a brick.

After finding only a few dollars in the register, the man hit him with the brick again and left the store. Meyer went home. His family took him to the hospital, where he was given fourteen stitches to close his wounds.

There is no further record of his life. Sources: New Castle News (16 January 1933, “Pittsburgh Man Pays Heavy Fine”; 9 October 1951, “Thug Uses Brick”); Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, 9 October 1951, “Thug Beats Up Storekeeper”.

Meyer Shussett, “Suspicion”, 14 January 1933 | Small Town Noir

Maybe I shouldn’t reblog Small Town Noir so nobody will know I’m about to steal the whole thing. Eh, no one reads this blog anyway.

nevver:

Shark week

Shit just got real.

warrenellis:

Collapse in Hebes Chasma on Mars     via NASA http://ift.tt/VeCfpC

warrenellis:

Collapse in Hebes Chasma on Mars via NASA http://ift.tt/VeCfpC

I know that the thing under my bed doesn’t exist. But I also know that if I keep my feet under the blanket, it won’t grab my ankle.
Stephen King  (via wordsnquotes)
phillipporter:

#cargoship #junkfromchina #stuffidontneed #savannah #river #port

Instagram: the NASCAR of photography.

phillipporter:

#cargoship #junkfromchina #stuffidontneed #savannah #river #port

Instagram: the NASCAR of photography.

From Sentimental Fiction by Jakub Karwowski.  These are so good it makes me both jealous and amazed.

Via LovingStranger.

- by -Christophe Negrel-

Flickr: http://flic.kr/p/oFKQ5o

- by -Christophe Negrel-

Flickr: http://flic.kr/p/oFKQ5o


Françoise Huguier, La Martinique, 1986

Françoise Huguier, La Martinique, 1986

WHITE SANDS by -Christopher Mongeau-

Flickr: http://flic.kr/p/h6wTut

WHITE SANDS by -Christopher Mongeau-

Flickr: http://flic.kr/p/h6wTut

But the 8-hour workday is too profitable for big business, not because of the amount of work people get done in eight hours (the average office worker gets less than three hours of actual work done in 8 hours) but because it makes for such a purchase-happy public. Keeping free time scarce means people pay a lot more for convenience, gratification, and any other relief they can buy. It keeps them watching television, and its commercials. It keeps them unambitious outside of work.

We’ve been led into a culture that has been engineered to leave us tired, hungry for indulgence, willing to pay a lot for convenience and entertainment, and most importantly, vaguely dissatisfied with our lives so that we continue wanting things we don’t have. We buy so much because it always seems like something is still missing.