- by -ari.gabel-

Flickr: http://flic.kr/p/nfKrna

- by -ari.gabel-

Flickr: http://flic.kr/p/nfKrna

intweetion:

The Delian Mode (Kara Blake, 2009)

"A documentary on Delia Derbyshire who created the theme song for “Doctor Who”. Musical pioneer Delia Derbyshire didn’t just create the Doctor Who theme music; she invented every sound it comprised. Her history, and the history of a BBC department that helped launch electronic music, is told in an innovative, idiosyncratic style." —Telluride Film Festival

matt-fry:

Alina in Little Tokyo // ohthumbelina

matt-fry:

Alina in Little Tokyo // ohthumbelina

cycleangelo:

JP BEVINS RED HOOK CRIT WOMENS PORTRAITS
I’m a sucker for a good set of portraits and JP did an incredible job with these. 

"Despite the weather conditions, despite a crash during the women’s race that left a racer with a broken collarbone, despite having to travel across the country, overseas, or from their home on the other end of Brooklyn, these women are amazing. I’m honored I was able to shoot them."

Head over to nolifelikethislife.com to see more of JP Bevins’ work.

01660011 by -joshsoskin-

Flickr: http://flic.kr/p/mT4NeW

01660011 by -joshsoskin-

Flickr: http://flic.kr/p/mT4NeW

nevver:

Smile till it hurts
orphanwork:

Stephen Dupont

orphanwork:

Stephen Dupont

historicaltimes:

Underwater vehicle in use by the Israeli Commando unit 1967

historicaltimes:

Underwater vehicle in use by the Israeli Commando unit 1967

John by -MxxxxM-

Flickr: http://flic.kr/p/mDb18t

John by -MxxxxM-

Flickr: http://flic.kr/p/mDb18t

strandbooks:

Marked passage, Despair by Vladimir Nabokov, page 31.
I am soo guilty of this.

I remember reading Despair very clearly. I don’t remember what I wrote about it, though.

strandbooks:

Marked passage, Despair by Vladimir Nabokov, page 31.

I am soo guilty of this.

I remember reading Despair very clearly. I don’t remember what I wrote about it, though.

filmap:

Paris, Texas
Wim Wenders. 1984

El Rancho Motel
901 East Dickinson Boulevard, Fort Stockton, Texas, USA
See in map

See in imdb

cinephilearchive:

“Originally I didn’t want to do it. I’ve enjoyed reading Chandler, though I never did finish ‘The Long Goodbye,’ and I liked those 1940s movies, but I just didn’t want to play around with them. I was sent the script by the producers and at first I said, ‘I don’t want to do Raymond Chandler.’ If you say ‘Philip Marlowe,’ people just think of Humphrey Bogart. Robert Mitchum was being proposed for it. But I just didn’t want to do another Philip Marlowe film and have it wrap up the same way all the other films did. I think it was David Picker, the production chief at United Artists, who suggested Elliott Gould for Marlowe — and then I was interested.

 “She wrote that [The Big Sleep] like a man. She writes good.”Howard Hawks, quoted in Hawks on Hawks 

So I read Leigh Brackett's script — she wrote the script of ‘The Big Sleep’ for Hawks — and in her version, in the last scene, Marlowe pulled out his gun and killed his best friend, Terry Lennox. It was so out of character for Marlowe, I said, ‘I'll do the picture, but you cannot change that ending! It must be in the contract.’ They all agreed, which was very surprising. If she hadn't written that ending, I guarantee I wouldn't have done it. It said, ‘This is just a movie.’ After that, we had him do his funny little dance down the road and you hear ‘Hooray for Hollywood,’ and that's what it's really about — ‘Hooray for Hollywood.’ It even looked like a road made in a Hollywood studio. And with Eileen Wade driving past, it's like the final scene in ‘The Third Man’!

I decided that we were going to call him Rip Van Marlowe, as if he’d been asleep for twenty years, had woken up and was wandering through this landscape of the early 1970s, but trying to invoke the morals of a previous era. I put him in that dark suit, white shirt and tie, while everyone else was smelling incense and smoking pot and going topless; everything was health food and exercise and cool. So we just satirized that whole time. And that’s why that line of Elliott’s — ‘It’s OK with me’ — became his key line throughout the film.” —Robert Altman
Altman describes his particular way of shooting ‘The Long Goodbye’:
“I decided that the camera should never stop moving. It was arbitrary. We would just put the camera on a dolly and everything would move or pan, but it didn’t match the action; usually it was counter to it. It gave me that feeling that when the audience see the film, they’re kind of a voyeur. You’re looking at something you shouldn’t be looking at. Not that what you’re seeing is off limits; just that you’re not supposed to be there. You had to see over someone’s shoulder or peer round someone’s back. I just think that in so many films everything’s so beautiful, the lighting is gorgeous and with each shot everything is relit. My method also means you don’t have to light for close-ups; you only have to accommodate what may happen, so you just light the scene and it saves a lot of time. The rougher it looked, the better it served my purpose.
I was worried about the harsh light of southern California and I wanted to give the film the soft, pastel look you see on old postcards from the 1940s. So we post-flashed the film even further than we did on ‘McCabe & Mrs Miller,’ almost 100 percent.”

Leigh Brackett’s screenplay for ‘The Long Goodbye’ (NOTE: For educational purposes only). Thanks to bobdole1357 and the great folks at Write to Reel.

Film critic Tony Macklin visited Leigh Brackett “on a hot, humid, blazing July 1975 day” at her farmhouse in Kinsman, Ohio. “I vividly remember Leigh’s making us lemonade to help cool us — it was pure sugar.” See also: Leigh Brackett — Journeyman Plumber. As did some research for a post about ‘Rio Bravo,’ Daniel Martin Eckhart discovered more and more about what must have been a very special friendship between Brackett and Hawks.

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

// 

One of my favorites; certainly my favorite Altman. I love when characters - or even plots - are at odds with the tropes that are in use. So the comedy becomes darker, richer - and the question becomes is this nihilism, naïveté, or something new in Gould’s Marlowe?  The topless neighbors seem in some ways more real than the characters we identify with, and then the moment passes and there’s Arnold Schwarzenegger, there’s the noir violence. But all with such a light touch and perfect rhythm. “What do I need a cat for, I got a girl?”

cinephilearchive:

“Originally I didn’t want to do it. I’ve enjoyed reading Chandler, though I never did finish ‘The Long Goodbye,’ and I liked those 1940s movies, but I just didn’t want to play around with them. I was sent the script by the producers and at first I said, ‘I don’t want to do Raymond Chandler.’ If you say ‘Philip Marlowe,’ people just think of Humphrey Bogart. Robert Mitchum was being proposed for it. But I just didn’t want to do another Philip Marlowe film and have it wrap up the same way all the other films did. I think it was David Picker, the production chief at United Artists, who suggested Elliott Gould for Marlowe — and then I was interested.


“She wrote that [The Big Sleep] like a man. She writes good.”
Howard Hawks, quoted in Hawks on Hawks

So I read Leigh Brackett's script — she wrote the script of ‘The Big Sleep’ for Hawks — and in her version, in the last scene, Marlowe pulled out his gun and killed his best friend, Terry Lennox. It was so out of character for Marlowe, I said, ‘I'll do the picture, but you cannot change that ending! It must be in the contract.’ They all agreed, which was very surprising. If she hadn't written that ending, I guarantee I wouldn't have done it. It said, ‘This is just a movie.’ After that, we had him do his funny little dance down the road and you hear ‘Hooray for Hollywood,’ and that's what it's really about — ‘Hooray for Hollywood.’ It even looked like a road made in a Hollywood studio. And with Eileen Wade driving past, it's like the final scene in ‘The Third Man’!

I decided that we were going to call him Rip Van Marlowe, as if he’d been asleep for twenty years, had woken up and was wandering through this landscape of the early 1970s, but trying to invoke the morals of a previous era. I put him in that dark suit, white shirt and tie, while everyone else was smelling incense and smoking pot and going topless; everything was health food and exercise and cool. So we just satirized that whole time. And that’s why that line of Elliott’s — ‘It’s OK with me’ — became his key line throughout the film.” —Robert Altman

Altman describes his particular way of shooting ‘The Long Goodbye’:

“I decided that the camera should never stop moving. It was arbitrary. We would just put the camera on a dolly and everything would move or pan, but it didn’t match the action; usually it was counter to it. It gave me that feeling that when the audience see the film, they’re kind of a voyeur. You’re looking at something you shouldn’t be looking at. Not that what you’re seeing is off limits; just that you’re not supposed to be there. You had to see over someone’s shoulder or peer round someone’s back. I just think that in so many films everything’s so beautiful, the lighting is gorgeous and with each shot everything is relit. My method also means you don’t have to light for close-ups; you only have to accommodate what may happen, so you just light the scene and it saves a lot of time. The rougher it looked, the better it served my purpose.

I was worried about the harsh light of southern California and I wanted to give the film the soft, pastel look you see on old postcards from the 1940s. So we post-flashed the film even further than we did on ‘McCabe & Mrs Miller,’ almost 100 percent.”

Leigh Brackett’s screenplay for ‘The Long Goodbye’ (NOTE: For educational purposes only). Thanks to bobdole1357 and the great folks at Write to Reel.

Film critic Tony Macklin visited Leigh Brackett “on a hot, humid, blazing July 1975 day” at her farmhouse in Kinsman, Ohio. “I vividly remember Leigh’s making us lemonade to help cool us — it was pure sugar.” See also: Leigh Brackett — Journeyman Plumber. As did some research for a post about ‘Rio Bravo,’ Daniel Martin Eckhart discovered more and more about what must have been a very special friendship between Brackett and Hawks.

For more film related items throughout the day, follow Cinephilia & Beyond on Twitter. Get Cinephilia & Beyond in your inbox by signing in. You can also follow our RSS feed. Please use our Google Custom Search for better results. If you enjoy Cinephilia & Beyond, please consider making a small donation to keep it going:

One of my favorites; certainly my favorite Altman. I love when characters - or even plots - are at odds with the tropes that are in use. So the comedy becomes darker, richer - and the question becomes is this nihilism, naïveté, or something new in Gould’s Marlowe? The topless neighbors seem in some ways more real than the characters we identify with, and then the moment passes and there’s Arnold Schwarzenegger, there’s the noir violence. But all with such a light touch and perfect rhythm. “What do I need a cat for, I got a girl?”

shanghai by -yuanxiaopeng-

Flickr: http://flic.kr/p/8b8C2C

shanghai by -yuanxiaopeng-

Flickr: http://flic.kr/p/8b8C2C

I haven’t gone in a long time [to a Masters of Horror dinner]. I went to the first few and it was a lot of fun. [..] Then, it sort of became something else. I think the night that got me— David Cronenberg showed up. And he’s an old friend of mine. And unfortunately, he takes himself so seriously these days…He’s an artist now.
And literally, he was holding court in the middle of the room, so I came over to talk to him. And he didn’t look at me. And I thought, this is enough of this, forget it, goodbye. And I walked out, I thought, I don’t need this anymore. And you know, fine, Eli Roth with his Hollywood hair … Darren Aronofsky, secretly I think hates horror films… Let the geniuses go. Let them go— let them be geniuses. I’ll stay home.
[Interviewer: Play X-Box?] Hell yeah.

John Carpenter. (via twiststreet)

John Carpenter is so rad.

(via stellarcaprice)

I’ve lost my cool and gone total fan boy meeting 3 people in my life: Bill Sienkiewicz, Peter Tscherkassky, and John Carpenter. Each of them was as humble as it gets. Each is a genius.